Publications

Refereed Journal Articles

Lieutenant, E. (in press). Methods and outcomes of student engagement in systematic program planning. Student Engagement in Higher Education Journal.

Systematic planning is a program management technique designed to facilitate continuous improvements to educational programs through evidence-based decision-making. Constituent engagement is an essential component of systematic planning, but little is known about how higher education programs engage students in program planning, assessment, and decision-making processes. To better understand how responsive higher education programs are to student engagement, this study examines the methods and outcomes of student engagement in systematic program planning in Library and Information Science (LIS) programs. A hybrid, problem-driven content analysis of 15 comprehensive accreditation self-study documents found that LIS programs used a variety of student engagement methods – quantitative and qualitative, formative and summative, systematic and ad-hoc – to engage students in systematic program planning. However, these methods did not necessarily result in substantive programmatic outcomes. The results of this study will be useful to higher education faculty, staff, and administrators who are interested in designing more inclusive and responsive systematic planning processes through authentic and meaningful student engagement methods.

 

Refereed Book Chapters

Lieutenant, E. (2018). Student engagement for student learning: Preparing inclusive and impactful change agents through high-impact student engagement practices. In P. T. Jaeger (Series Eds.), Advances in Librarianship: Vol. 44a. Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the future of library and information science education (J. Percell, L. C. Sarin, P. T. Jaeger, & J. C. Bertot, Eds., pp. 119–138). Bingley, UK: Emerald Publishing Limited.

This chapter examines the use of high-impact student engagement practices in library and information science (LIS) education programs. This chapter opens with an overview of systematic planning, an outcomes-based process used to support the continuous development and improvement of higher education programs. It then details the essential contributions that students can make in systematic planning through high-impact student engagement practices, and summarizes the core competencies that students develop through these practices. A synthesis of the extant research on high-impact student engagement practices in LIS education and the results of a content analysis of select accreditation self-study reports were used to identify how these practices are utilized in LIS programs. Five high-impact student engagement practices were used by LIS education programs: student advisory boards, student-organized meetings, student-run surveys, student-led course evaluations, and student-led curriculum development programs. These practices may be used as pedagogical tools to support mutually beneficial outcomes for LIS students and their educational programs. Student leadership in systematic program planning promotes positive student and programmatic outcomes. Broader adoption of these practices across LIS education programs will help promote student learning, prepare students for professional practice, and improve the quality and relevance of LIS education programs.

 

Refereed Conference Papers, Presentations, and Posters with Published Proceedings

Lieutenant, E. (2018). Publicly reporting educational data: An analysis of current practices. Manuscript submitted for review.
Lieutenant, E. (2016). Online education, minority students, and library and information science: A longitudinal trend data analysis of ALA-accredited degree program enrollment rates. In T. Bastiaens (Ed.), Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2016 (C. Ho & G. Lin, Eds., pp. 860-870). Waynesville, NC: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education.

Online education can promote equal access to higher education opportunities for minority students from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds. This study examines how the proliferation of online degree programs in library and information science (LIS) has impacted the racial and ethnic diversity of LIS students. Specifically, this study analyzes whether the presence or absence of a 100% online degree program accredited by the LIS field’s specialized accrediting agency, the American Library Association (ALA), influences racial and ethnic minority student enrollment and representation. The outcomes of this study on the relationships between online education, minority students, and LIS education will be useful to educators, scholars, and professionals who seek to promote educational opportunities of minority students.

Lieutenant, E., & Kules, B. (2016). Analysis of LIS student engagement in systematic program planning: Preliminary results. In X. Lin & M. Khoo (Eds.), iConference 2016 Proceedings (pp. 1–7). Urbana, IL: iSchools.

Systematic program planning is an approach that facilitates continuous higher education improvements through evidence-based, data-driven decision-making that includes the program’s constituencies. Library and information science (LIS) education master’s degree programs are required by the American Library Association to demonstrate that their constituents are engaged throughout their ongoing, broad-based systematic planning processes. Minimal research exists on how programs engage their constituents in systematic planning and how responsive programs are to their constituents. This study examines how LIS programs engage an essential constituency, students. A content analysis of 15 accreditation self-study documents was conducted to understand what methods programs use to engage students, how frequently and consistently these methods are used, and what types of changes and improvements were implemented based on student engagement. This paper reports our preliminary findings, which will be useful to educational programs seeking to enhance their systematic planning processes and make their constituent engagement efforts more fruitful.

Lieutenant, E., & Kules, B. (2016). Are iSchools more adaptable than library schools? Analysis of LIS student engagement in programmatic changes and improvements. In X. Lin & M. Khoo (Eds.), iConference 2016 Proceedings (pp. 1–4). Urbana, IL: iSchools.

The iSchools organization and its 65 member schools frequently reference their roles and responsibilities as leaders in information education. With the iSchools’ commitment to advance the information field (iField) through collaborative academic and research endeavors, it would logically follow that individual iSchool constituents are engaged in promoting improvements to their own educational programs, thus strengthening the future of the iField. This poster examines how iSchools and non-iSchools engage their master’s student constituents in implementing programmatic changes and improvements to their library and information science (LIS) degree program(s). The results of a content analysis of 15 American Library Association (ALA) accreditation self-study documents were compared based on iSchool membership status to determine whether iSchools were more likely to implement programmatic changes and improvements based on student engagement than non-iSchools. Our results revealed little difference between how iSchools and non-iSchools use LIS student engagement to implement programmatic changes and improvements.

 

Monographs

National Forum on Education Statistics. (2018). Forum guide to early warning systems. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics. Manuscript submitted for review.

The Forum Guide to Early Warning Systems provides information and best practices to help education agencies plan, develop, implement, and use an early warning system in their agency to inform interventions that improve student outcomes. This resource reviews early warning systems and their use in education agencies; explains how to adopt an effective system planning process; illustrates the role of early warning indicators, quality data, and analytical model in early warning systems; recommends best practices in developing, implementing, and using early warning systems; and highlights seven case studies from state and local education agencies who have implemented, or are in the process of implementing, an early warning system.

National Forum on Education Statistics. (2018). Forum guide to collecting and using attendance data. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics.

The Forum Guide to Collecting and Using Attendance Data is designed to help state and local education agency staff improve their attendance data practices – the collection, reporting, and use of attendance data to improve student and school outcomes. The guide offers best practice suggestions and features real-life examples of how attendance data have been used by education agencies. The guide includes a set of voluntary attendance codes that can be used to compare attendance data across schools, districts, and states. The guide also features tip sheets for a wide range of education agency staff who work with attendance data.

Lieutenant, E. (2012). A capital man: Examining Thomas Jefferson’s legacy through the prism of Washington D.C.’s cultural heritage sites (Capstone thesis). Trenton, NJ: Thomas Edison State University.

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate how Thomas Jefferson’s life and career are represented by various cultural heritage sites located within Washington, D.C. Observational research was conducted the week of April 9, 2012. The researcher spent six hours spread out throughout a single day at three specific cultural heritage sites: the Thomas Jefferson Memorial, representing Jefferson’s political career; the Library of Congress’s “Thomas Jefferson’s Library” exhibition, representing Jefferson’s scholarly career; and the Smithsonian National Museum of American History’s “Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello: Paradox of Liberty” exhibition, representing Jefferson’s stance toward slavery. Through an analysis of both site presentation and visitor reaction, this project identifies the overarching themes and messages about Thomas Jefferson’s life and career visitors’ gain from visiting various cultural heritage sites located within Washington, D.C.

 

Commissioned Reports

Cooke, N. A., Hepburn, P., Lieutenant, E., & Dow, M. (2017). Report of the Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation. Commissioned by the American Library Association, Executive Board.

The Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation was charged with the development of a white paper that describes the fields and context for which the American Library Association (ALA) will be accrediting in the future and to make such recommendations as may arise in the process of that development to the ALA Executive Board. The white paper was to address the following: Accreditation of information programs – who is doing that, how do they or might they relate to LIS program; disconnect or perceived disconnect between skills increasingly needed (e.g., information architecture), the current curricula of LIS programs, and standards/statements of core competencies currently in place; values – e.g., public access, privacy, intellectual freedom – as the common thread binding together LIS and related fields and a core element in curricula; and the changing institutional context for accreditation, including factors such as pedagogical innovation, assessment and resources. The white paper was to include a conceptual statement as a framework for the development of future standards by the ALA Committee on Accreditation.

Lieutenant, E. (2016). Online forum analysis results. Commissioned by the American Library Association, Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation.

This report was authored on behalf of the American Library Association’s (ALA) Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation to address, in part, the Task Force’s charge to develop a white paper that describes the fields and context for which the ALA will be accrediting in the future and to make such recommendations as may arise in the process of that development to the ALA Executive Board.

Lieutenant, E. (2016). Survey of ALISE Deans, Directors, and Chairs analysis report. Commissioned by the American Library Association, Task Force on Accreditation Process and Communication.

This report was authored on behalf of the American Library Association’s (ALA) Task Force on Accreditation Process and Communication to address, in part, the Task Force’s charge to make recommendations to the ALA Executive Board on internal and external communications, including the purpose and process of the ALA accreditation program.

Lieutenant, E. (2016). Understanding the context of LIS education and accreditation. Commissioned by the American Library Association, Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation.

This paper was authored on behalf of the American Library Association’s (ALA) Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation to address, in part, the Task Force’s charge to develop a white paper that describes the fields and context for which the ALA will be accrediting in the future and to make such recommendations as may arise in the process of that development to the ALA Executive Board.

Lieutenant, E. (2014). Military reference & research: sources and resources program evaluation. Commissioned by the Special Libraries Association, Military Libraries Division.

This evaluation collected data from 47 program attendees of the December 11, 2014 DC/SLA Military Libraries Group “Military Reference & Research: Sources and Resources” program at the Library of Congress. Attendee perceptions were solicited in four key areas: program quality, timeliness, and relevance; motivation for attendance; interest in future topics and programs; and recommendations for program improvement.

Lieutenant, E., & Schneider, R. (2014). Targeted market analysis for neighborhood library services. Commissioned by the DC Public Library, Watha T. Daniel / Shaw Neighborhood Library.

The purpose of this project is three-fold: The staff of Watha T. Daniel / Shaw Neighborhood Library (WTDS) would like to know more about who they are serving, how to deliver services that meets the needs of new and longtime residents and offer programming that is interesting and relevant. Mostly, they are looking for ways to make their library a more important hub in the neighborhood and expand awareness of their services and programs. They want to take stock of where the library’s sphere of influence begins and ends in the community. There is presently no such analysis being done on a per-branch basis, so this will be an important first step in learning who the WTDS Library branch serves directly. In addition, the library doesn’t have an easy to use database to store organization contact information that can be used for mailings and other outreach efforts. This presents issues when trying to identify potential partner organizations to collaborate with. This project attempts to address the needs of WTDS through: the creation of a service area map, a demographic analysis report, and a spreadsheet of community partnership contact information.

 

Technical Guides

Lieutenant, E., & Warren, M., Glascoe, K., & Bunting, K. (2017). Special Libraries Association student group manual. McLean, VA: Special Libraries Association, Students and New Professionals Advisory Council.

The Special Libraries Association (SLA) is a nonprofit global organization for innovative information professionals and their strategic partners1 . Our members represent a broad spectrum of information professionals, including, but not limited to, corporate, academic, nonprofit, and government information specialists. SLA promotes and strengthens its members’ expertise through learning, advocacy, and networking initiatives. If you are keen to develop your career, strengthen your professional competencies, and make an impact within your organization and profession, SLA is the association for you. Read more…

Lieutenant, E., & Inge, L. (2016). iDiversity curriculum development project guide. College Park, MD: University of Maryland, College of Information Studies, iDiversity.

This project was designed under the direction of iDiversity, a student organization at the University of Maryland, College of Information Studies (UMD iSchool). iDiversity was created to address library and information science students’ invested interest and concern about the barriers to access created when issues of diversity, representation, accessibility, inclusion, and cultural competency are not successfully acknowledged throughout the information professions. iDiversity was formerly founded on February 3rd, 2011, and has since gained strong support from the UMD iSchool students, faculty, and alumni as well as support from the community and academics from other areas of study. Read more…

 

Invited Brief Articles in General Publications

Lieutenant, E. (2016). Scholarship workshop. LISten: The Association of Graduate Library & Information Science Students Newsletter, 1(2), 11. Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America, School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Library and Information Science, Association of Graduate Library and Information Science Students.

This worksheet was distributed to students who attended the Scholarship Workshop, an event sponsored by the Library and Information Science Alumni Association and the Association of Graduate Library and Information Science Students. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2015). Student perspective: Liz at ALA. LISten: The Association of Graduate Library & Information Science Students Newsletter, 1(1), 6. Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America, School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Library and Information Science, Association of Graduate Library and Information Science Students.

The American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference was the largest conference I’ve attended. This was my fifth ALA-affiliated conference, having previous experience as a presenter at the state-level, a scholarship winner at the division-level, and an attendee at the national level. Working with the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) staff as a Student-to-Staff representative was certainly a unique experience, but there was something different about this conference that went far beyond my participation in the Student-to-Staff program. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2014). MLW 2013: Deb Hunt “Career agility: Transforming knowledge and expertise into strategic value.” In M. Kaddell (Ed.), 2013 Best Practices for Government Libraries – Managing Evolving Resources: Strategies, Capabilities, and Alternatives (pp. 318-319). Dayton, OH: LexisNexis.

The Military Libraries Workshop kicked off its first day with a presentation by Deb Hunt, the 2013 SLA President. Her speech focused on the importance of information professionals in society, ways to improve our information-related skills, and how to best demonstrate the value of the work we do in a variety of information settings. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2014). MLW 2013: Jane Killian “Creating a virtual library in the age of closings.” In M. Kaddell (Ed.), 2013 Best Practices for Government Libraries – Managing Evolving Resources: Strategies, Capabilities, and Alternatives (pp. 320-321). Dayton, OH: LexisNexis.

Jane’s speech focused on her experience building a virtual library for the Defense Forensic Science Center (DFSC), a forensic laboratory that provides services to Department of Defense military criminal investigative organizations. Prior to Jane’s arrival, the DFSC did not have any centralized information resources available to its employees. Jane’s work as a solo librarian consisted of building a virtual library from the ground-up, a task that she continues to this day. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2014). MLW 2013: Dr. Virginia “Suzy” Young’s presentation embodied resiliency and adaptability. In M. Kaddell (Ed.), 2013 Best Practices for Government Libraries – Managing Evolving Resources: Strategies, Capabilities, and Alternatives (pp. 322-323). Dayton, OH: LexisNexis.

Dr Young was never supposed to speak at the Military Libraries Workshop. John Digilio of Reed Smith, LLP, and the 2013-2015 SLA Treasurer, was scheduled to give a presentation: “In the Balance: Tools to Increase Your Personal and Professional Creativity”. Unfortunately, John fell ill and was unable to make it to the workshop, but Suzy came to the rescue with little time to spare. She only had four hours to prepare her speech, PowerPoint slides included. Suzy’s presentation preparation truly embodied the theme of MLW2013: “Resiliency and Adaptability.” Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2014). MLW 2013: Marcy Phelps “Top tips for turning information into insights.” In M. Kaddell (Ed.), 2013 Best Practices for Government Libraries – Managing Evolving Resources: Strategies, Capabilities, and Alternatives (pp. 324-325). Dayton, OH: LexisNexis.

The second day of the Military Libraries Workshop began with a presentation by Marcy Phelps, an independent information professional specialized in business research and analysis. Marcy’s presentation focused on how to incorporate information analysis into your work as an information professional, along with tips and tools for delivering information in creative ways for a variety of clients. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2014). MLW 2013: Dr. Steven MacCall “Social media: Just the next technical agility challenge!” In M. Kaddell (Ed.), 2013 Best Practices for Government Libraries – Managing Evolving Resources: Strategies, Capabilities, and Alternatives (pp. 326-327). Dayton, OH: LexisNexis.

Dr McCall’s presentation focused on his use of social media as an instructional tool in his work as a library and information science educator. I found his presentation fascinating for many personal reasons: I’m an LIS student, I’m an active user of Twitter, and I blog publicly. It was interesting to hear what his thoughts were on his students’ social media activity, and made me wonder what my own professors think of my social media presence. I of course, live-tweeted his session, along with the rest of the conference. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2014). MLW 2013: Margie Hlava “Big data content organization, discovery, and management.” In M. Kaddell (Ed.), 2013 Best Practices for Government Libraries – Managing Evolving Resources: Strategies, Capabilities, and Alternatives (pp. 328-329). Dayton, OH: LexisNexis.

Margie Hlava’s presentation on Big Data was appropriately BIG. At 93 slides, her hour and half long presentation served as crash-course on big data, information organization and retrieval, and skills library and information professionals can use when working with big data. This recap will only scratch the surface of Margie’s presentation, and I highly recommend reading through her entire set of slides to get a true picture of what she covered. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2014). MLW 2013: Dr. Gail Nicula (Moderator) “Approaching challenges through adaptation and innovation” panel. In M. Kaddell (Ed.), 2013 Best Practices for Government Libraries – Managing Evolving Resources: Strategies, Capabilities, and Alternatives (pp. 330-331). Dayton, OH: LexisNexis.

This post is part of a larger series on the 2013 Military Libraries Workshop, organized by the Military Libraries Division of the Special Libraries Association. The workshop took place on December 10-11, 2013 in Huntsville, Alabama. Read more…

 

Refereed Public Scholarship and Editorials

Lieutenant, E. (2016, Jan 7). Practitioner engagement in LIS education. Association of College & Research Libraries.

As a current LIS student, constituent engagement in higher education is one of my passions. Most of my attention has focused on improving student engagement in LIS education. I’ve spent the past year researching LIS student engagement in systematic program planning: The methods used to engage students, how systematically these methods are employed, and the types of programmatic changes implemented based on student engagement. Some of my most rewarding pre-professional experiences have been improving student engagement within my own LIS program: Organizing engagement sessions and meetings, creating and disseminating surveys and analyzing their data, and collaboratively leading various systematic planning initiatives to improve our students’ educational experiences. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2014, February 21). Ski jumping into our Olympic Archives. U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.

Here at the National Archives, we’ve been busy watching the Olympics and rooting for Team U.S.A. All the excitement of watching snowboarders fly through the air and figure skaters dance on ice has us reminiscing about Winter Olympics of the past. Now that the 2014 Winter Olympics are officially over, take a trip down memory lane (or a Giant Schalom down to our archives) and check out some of our records! While you’re there, be sure to tag your favorite Olympic-related photos. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2014, February 19). President’s Day at the National Archives. U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.

This week we celebrated President’s Day, a U.S. federal holiday that officially honors George Washington’s birthday. While the holiday may be for George, we at the National Archives love all our presidents equally. We’ve been celebrating by diving into our catalog and tagging photos of all of our nation’s presidents. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2014, February 11). For Valentine’s Day, ten records about love. U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.

February is upon us, and while it may be cold outside, we’re keeping warm with thoughts of the upcoming Valentine’s Day holiday. Valentine’s Day, also known as the Feast of Saint Valentine, has been celebrated for centuries. While Valentines is sometimes exclusively thought of as a time for lovers, our top 10 Valentines Day records from the National Archives show there are plenty of different ways to celebrate the holiday. Read more…

 

Invited Public Scholarship and Editorials

Lieutenant, E. (2016, April 16). Storify from #teach4justice #fight4edu Workshop “Teaching as social justice: Equity, diversity, race.” Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory.

On Thursday, April 14, the Graduate Center hosted an open, livestreamed workshop on the relationship between teaching and social justice. “Teaching as Social Justice: Equity, Diversity, Race” explored the essential question: How can teaching address the unequal distribution of resources, wealth, privilege, and opportunity along axes of race, gender, sexual orientation, and ability? This workshop is the seventh in a 2015-2016 Futures Initiative and HASTAC collaboration “The University Worth Fighting For”, a series of workshops that tie student-centered, engaged pedagogical practices to institutional change, race, equality, gender, and social justice. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2016, March 29). This is the university I fight for: Student engagement in educational change. Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory.

This past year, I’ve been leading a research project with my HASTAC mentor, Bill Kules, on student inclusion in higher education change processes. As a 2015-16 HASTAC Scholar, I’ve also been an active participant in The University Worth Fighting For initiative. These two projects share the common goal to tie student-centered, engaged pedagogical practices to institutional change. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2016, Jan 30). Interdisciplinary dialog: Graduate student conversations across the arts & sciences. Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory.

How does your discipline define the human person? This past fall semester, graduate students from the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and formal sciences met for a series of informal presentations and facilitated conversations to answer that question. This Fall Conversation Series, organized by the School of Arts & Sciences’ Graduate Advisory Council at The Catholic University of America, aimed to establish cross-departmental dialog, interdisciplinary relationships, and strengthen the School’s intellectual community. Read more…

Lieutenant, E., Cooper, K., Fooksman, H., & Hillary, A. (2016, Jan 26). The Intersection of Open Scholarship + Social Justice. Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory.

Welcome to our newest student-led discussion forum: Ideas in Circulation: Open Scholarship for Social Justice. This is the fifth of eight conversations in The University Worth Fighting For, a year-long project designed to tie student-centered, engaged practices in our classrooms to larger issues of institutional change, equality, race, gender, and all forms of social justice. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2015, August 17). Reflection – Discovery, connection, opportunity. Special Libraries Association, DC Chapter.

As a current library school student, my history with SLA is relatively short. Prior to the start of my first semester at The Catholic University of America (CUA), I attended my first CUA/SLA planning meeting in August 2013. Being a new student, I was interested in learning more about what CUA/SLA had to offer. While I had no intention of assuming a formal leadership position at the start of that meeting, I agreed to serve as Secretary thanks to the encouragement of CUA/SLA’s leadership team. Unbeknownst to me, my attendance at that meeting would set me on a path to discovery, connections, and opportunities at the student chapter, chapter, division, and association levels. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2015, May 22). CUA LIS practicum diaries: Elizabeth Lieutenant, Georgetown University Lauinger Library. The Catholic University of America, School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Library and Information Science.

Assessment can appear to be a mysterious concept for some new LIS professionals, as it isn’t a major focus in LIS curricula (Askew and Theodore-Shusta, 2013). Academic librarians have a number of resources to address this oversight in their education, including participating in ACRL’s Immersion Program or partnering with campus units dedicated to supporting and sustaining academic cultures of assessment. Fortunately, I’ve gained a highly developed knowledge and skill set through my various research and work experiences, which has been greatly enhanced through my Library Instruction practicum. Under the supervision of Sandy Hussey, Research Instruction Coordinator & Senior Reference Librarian at Georgetown University’s Lauinger Library, I’ve worked on a variety of assessment-related projects that have allowed me to apply my knowledge of and experience with assessment within a library setting. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2014, November 16). What’s your theme? – Pause. Special Libraries Association, DC Chapter.

As a student and new professional, I sometimes feel like my life never stops. Having to juggle multiple roles and responsibilities while tending to my work, education, service, writing, research, and professional (and personal) development can be overwhelming at times. Although it has certainly been helpful to prioritize my responsibilities, be selective in my pursuits, and always be mindful of goals, I’ve found the best way to achieve balance is by taking the time pause and engage in reflection. Read more…

Lieutenant, E. (2013 – 2014). What I’m Learning in Library School. Special Libraries Association, Social Science Division.

In this monthly series, student members of SLA from library and information science programs across the United States shared their thoughts and experiences in response to a themed prompt.

Lawton, T., & Lieutenant, E. (2014, Feb 12). Hack ALA: Accreditation standards! Hack Library School.

Accreditation has been a part of US librarianship since 1923. In 1956, ALA’s Committee on Accreditation (COA) became a standing committee of ALA. COA is responsible for the execution of the accreditation program of ALA, and to develop and formulate standards of education for library and information studies for the approval of ALA council. The mission of the ALA Office for Accreditation (OA) is to serve: “the general public, students, employers, and library and information studies Master’s programs through the promotion and advancement of education in library and information studies.” Read more…

Lieutenant, E., & Spiva, S. (2013, Feb 28). How to build the future you. Cisco.

I am just beginning my career as a Library and Information Science (LIS) student, and I’m currently in the process of deciding which graduate school to attend. I was fortunate enough to be accepted at all three of the schools I applied to, so I have a big decision ahead of me. Utilizing social media, I have been able to follow each of my prospective schools’ Twitter accounts, as well as other school accounts that might provide relevant information (such as campus libraries and archives, career centers, and LIS-related student groups). Read more…

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