Presentations

Invited Talks

Lieutenant, E. (2016, June). Presenting at professional conferences. Association of Graduate Library and Information Science Students (AGLISS), Washington, DC.

This presentation reviewed how students can pursue presentation opportunities at professional conferences. The goal of this presentation was to provide student attendees with advise and guidance that would enable them to pursue similar opportunities.

Reilly, H., Jones, S., Lieutenant, E., Sarin, L., Tribble, C., & Vincent, J. (2016, May). Future of the field. Maryland Library Association and Delaware Library Association (MLA/DLA) Joint Library Conference, Ocean City, MD.

The moderator for this panel is Hope Reilly, an MLS candidate at the University of Maryland’s iSchool expecting to graduate in May 2016. Originally from Waldorf, Maryland, she has interned with Montgomery County Public Libraries and worked as a 2015 Junior Fellow in the Germanic and Slavic Division at the Library of Congress. Hope is heavily involved with the iSchool and serves as the events coordinator for iDiversity, the first student organization in the LIS field to focus on promoting awareness for diversity, inclusion and accessibility. Hope will be joined by fellow MLS students, a first-year librarian, and a representative from University of Maryland’s iSchool and they will discuss current library trends and research. The University of Maryland recently completed a year-long lecture series and research project, Re-envisioning the MLS, which discussed the iSchool’s vision for how MLS students can and should be prepared to enter the field.

de Campos Salles, A. E., Lieutenant, E., Medina, M., & Nolan, S. (2015, November). Scholarship workshop. The Catholic University of America LIS Alumni Association Mentoring Event, Washington, DC.

This workshop will focus on scholarships and other financial opportunities that students can pursue to help pay for their tuition.

 

Refereed Conference Papers, Presentations, and Posters with Published Proceedings

Lieutenant, E. (2018). Publicly reporting educational data: An analysis of current practices. Manuscript submitted for publication.
Lieutenant, E. (2016). Online education, minority students, and library and information science: A longitudinal trend data analysis of ALA-accredited degree program enrollment rates. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2016 (pp. 860-870). Washington, DC: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education.

Online education can promote equal access to higher education opportunities for minority students from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds. This study examines how the proliferation of online degree programs in library and information science (LIS) has impacted the racial and ethnic diversity of LIS students. Specifically, this study analyzes whether the presence or absence of a 100% online degree program accredited by the LIS field’s specialized accrediting agency, the American Library Association (ALA), influences racial and ethnic minority student enrollment and representation. The outcomes of this study on the relationships between online education, minority students, and LIS education will be useful to educators, scholars, and professionals who seek to promote educational opportunities of minority students.

Lieutenant, E., & Kules, B. (2016). Analysis of LIS student engagement in systematic program planning: Preliminary results. In X. Lin & M. Khoo (Eds.), iConference 2016 Proceedings (pp. 1–7). Urbana, IL: iSchools.

Systematic program planning is an approach that facilitates continuous higher education improvements through evidence-based, data-driven decision-making that includes the program’s constituencies. Library and information science (LIS) education master’s degree programs are required by the American Library Association to demonstrate that their constituents are engaged throughout their ongoing, broad-based systematic planning processes. Minimal research exists on how programs engage their constituents in systematic planning and how responsive programs are to their constituents. This study examines how LIS programs engage an essential constituency, students. A content analysis of 15 accreditation self-study documents was conducted to understand what methods programs use to engage students, how frequently and consistently these methods are used, and what types of changes and improvements were implemented based on student engagement. This paper reports our preliminary findings, which will be useful to educational programs seeking to enhance their systematic planning processes and make their constituent engagement efforts more fruitful.

Lieutenant, E., & Kules, B. (2016). Are iSchools more adaptable than library schools? Analysis of LIS student engagement in programmatic changes and improvements. In X. Lin & M. Khoo (Eds.), iConference 2016 Proceedings (pp. 1–4). Urbana, IL: iSchools.

The iSchools organization and its 65 member schools frequently reference their roles and responsibilities as leaders in information education. With the iSchools’ commitment to advance the information field (iField) through collaborative academic and research endeavors, it would logically follow that individual iSchool constituents are engaged in promoting improvements to their own educational programs, thus strengthening the future of the iField. This poster examines how iSchools and non-iSchools engage their master’s student constituents in implementing programmatic changes and improvements to their library and information science (LIS) degree program(s). The results of a content analysis of 15 American Library Association (ALA) accreditation self-study documents were compared based on iSchool membership status to determine whether iSchools were more likely to implement programmatic changes and improvements based on student engagement than non-iSchools. Our results revealed little difference between how iSchools and non-iSchools use LIS student engagement to implement programmatic changes and improvements.

 

Refereed Conference Papers and Presentations without Published Proceedings

Inge, L. T., & Lieutenant, E. (2016, April). Student engagement in curricular innovation: Scaling iDiversity’s curriculum development project across campus. Innovations in Teaching and Learning (ITL UMD) Conference, College Park, MD.

iDiversity, a student organization in the University of Maryland’s College of Information Studies (iSchool), aims to promote student agency in curricular evaluation and improvement efforts through the iDiversity curriculum development project. iDiversity is dedicated to promoting diversity, inclusion, and accessibility within the information professions, and its curriculum development project aims to incorporate diversity into every course taught at the iSchool. Project members examine library science course curricula, compile suggested readings, and create discussion points to infuse diversity throughout each course’s syllabi. By embedding diversity into the iSchool’s curriculum, students are equipped with the knowledge needed to further promote diversity, inclusion, and accessibility within the information professions. This innovative curriculum development project supports students interested in playing an active leadership role in improving their own education by embedding diversity into their education. It also provides students with tangible curriculum design and project management skills that are crucial to their professional success. This project also offsets some of the workload traditionally assigned to individual instructors, some of whom may be interested in diversifying their course curricula, but lack the resources to do so on their own. We will discuss the development, implementation, and outcomes of this project, and how other academic units at the University of Maryland at College Park can engage their students by adopting this curriculum development project.

Lieutenant, E., & Inge, L. T. (2016, March). Student leaders, student-teachers: Embedding diversity into LIS education through iDiversity’s curriculum development project. Diversity, Equity, Race, Accessibility, and Identity in Library and Information Science Education (DERAIL) Forum, Boston, MA.

Students are primary stakeholders in LIS education, yet our perspectives, needs, and concerns are not as fully incorporated into LIS education improvement efforts as they should be. iDiversity, a student organization at the University of Maryland’s iSchool, aims to promote student agency in LIS curricular evaluation and improvement efforts through the iDiversity curriculum development project. iDiversity is dedicated to promoting diversity, inclusion, and accessibility within the information professions, and its curriculum development project aims to incorporate diversity into every course taught at the iSchool. Project members examine course curricula, compile suggested readings, and create discussion points to infuse diversity throughout each course’s syllabi. This curriculum development project supports students interested in playing an active leadership role in improving their own education by embedding diversity into LIS education. It also provides students with tangible curriculum design and project management experience. By embedding diversity into the iSchool’s curriculum, students are equipped with the knowledge needed to further promote diversity, inclusion, and accessibility within the information professions.

Lieutenant, E., & Kules, B. (2016, January). LIS student engagement in systematic program planning: Inclusion, impact, and innovation. Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) Annual Conference, Boston, MA.

Presents the results of a qualitative content analysis of 15 Program Presentations for evidence of the inclusion of student voices and perspectives in systematic planning: the various student engagement methods used, how frequently and consistently these methods are used, and the tangible programmatic improvements that result. Highlights unique and innovate approaches that will aid programs in creating inclusive decision-making processes, collaborating with students to implement change, and complying with the ALA accreditation Standards.

Lieutenant, E. (2015, November). Knowledge and the search for the human person. The Catholic University of America School of Arts and Sciences Fall Conversation Series, Washington, DC.

Library and information science (LIS) professionals have many names for the community members they seek to engage and serve: patron, client, user, borrower, and customer. Though innocuous on their surface, these names promote human commodification based on a person’s level of engagement in the life of the library. This further marginalizes underserved populations, whose personhood is left undefined and unacknowledged due to their lack of library engagement. A critical analysis of how these names devalue the whole person will spark discussion on how the LIS field can redefine its conception of the human person in more inclusive terms, thus promoting equitable and socially just LIS praxis.

 

Refereed Conference Posters without Published Proceedings

Lieutenant, E. (2017, January). The changing context of information education and accreditation. Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA.

The American Library Association formed the Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation to better understand the broader context of and changes in the information professions, information education, and specialized accreditation. This poster presents a portion of the author’s work, completed on behalf of the Task Force, in relation to the following research questions: 1. What characteristics are shared across academic units that offer ALA-accredited degrees? 2. Which specialized accreditation programs most closely relate to the ALA’s accreditation program, the accreditation of information education programs, and cognate educational programs?

Lieutenant, E. (2016, October). Structures of power: Institutionalizing diversity in LIS education program governance. Conference on Inclusion and Diversity in Library and Information Science (CIDLIS), College Park, MD.

Fostering a diverse, inclusive educational environment requires a systematic, collaborative approach that addresses all aspects of an organization’s operations and culture. Mission, goals, and objectives must be aligned with systematic planning and decision-making processes that support infusing diversity, inclusion, and anti-oppression into the higher education system. Governance structures dedicated to diversity can help ensure that these initiatives and efforts are robust, effective, and sustainable. This poster presentation explores how diversity has been institutionalized in LIS education program governance. Different governance models used in United States LIS education programs, such as standing committees, ad hoc working groups, and student organizations, will be comparatively analyzed and assessed. Specific analysis factors include governance status, dimensions of diversity addressed, and representation of constituency groups. This poster presentation will be useful for LIS program administrators, faculty, staff, and students who are interested in establishing a new or refining a pre-existing diversity governance body.

Lieutenant, E. (2016, August). Frameworks, standards, and systems: Investigating the relationships between information literacy, critical thinking, and creative thinking. Research Experience for Master’s Students (REMS) Poster Session, Ann Arbor, MI.

This poster presents a summary of findings from a research project that examines how information interactions can support the learning and development of higher-order cognitive processes. This poster presents an overview of three cognitive processes: Information literacy, critical thinking, and creative thinking. Scholars have proposed various frameworks, standards, and perspectives for studying these cognitive processes, yet minimal research explores the relationships between them. This poster presents a map of these three cognitive processes, which can be used to support the learning and development of information literacy, critical thinking, and creative thinking abilities. This background research will be used to inform a paper that proposes how information retrieval search systems should be redesigned to support the learning and development of these cognitive processes.

Lieutenant, E. (2016, August). Promoting diversity through online education: Analysis of LIS program enrollment rates. National Diversity in Libraries (NDLC) Conference, Los Angeles, CA.

Changes in higher education, technology, and the library and information science (LIS) field influence the recruitment and retention of students of color. This poster presents a longitudinal data analysis of trends in LIS program enrollment rates. Preliminary analysis indicate that students of color are more likely to enroll in LIS programs with an 100% online degree option. Additional programmatic factors are identified as potential contributors to the successful recruitment and retention of students of color.

Lieutenant, E. (2016, May). Do we eat our young? An analysis of new librarian and information professional employment trends. Maryland Library Association and Delaware Library Association (MLA/DLA) Joint Library Conference, Ocean City, MD.

The library and information science (LIS) field often discusses how new librarians and information professionals must be prepared to fulfill the new roles and responsibilities required of the changing LIS profession. However, longitudinal studies of recent graduate employment rates have not recently been conducted to determine if new librarians and information professionals are employed in these new and emerging sectors of the profession. To address this gap in understanding, this poster presentation will explore employment patterns for recent graduates of United States LIS degree programs. For this poster, secondary data analysis will be conducted on a decade of Library Journal’s Placement and Salaries Survey data. Longitudinal statistical trends in overall employment, job assignment, and organization type data will be presented to identify emerging and retreating employment opportunities for new librarians and information professionals. Discussion of limitations in the data set and recommendations for future study will be included to improve our current and future understanding of the LIS profession. This poster presentation will be valuable for current students, recent graduates, faculty, and employers who are interested in identifying emerging opportunities within the LIS profession and supporting students and new librarians and information professionals as they enter our evolving profession.

Lieutenant, E. (2016, February). “What are we going to do?” Applying content analysis methodology to solve your research problems. Bridging the Spectrum: A Symposium on Scholarship and Practice in Library and Information Science, Washington, DC.

Research methods are critical in legitimizing a discipline’s scholarly contributions and advancing evidence-based professional practice. When compared to other disciplines, LIS has historically held a limited understanding of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies and assessment and evaluation concepts (Connaway & Powell, 2010; Hernon, Dugan, & Schwartz, 2013). LIS scholars are now adopting more sophisticated research methodologies, including content analysis (Chu, 2015). This indicate potential improvements to the field’s research base and illustrate the need for professionals to enhance their facility with research methods utilized in LIS. This poster presentation will review the problem-driven content analysis procedures defined by Krippendorff (2004) and applied to a study by Lieutenant and Kules. It will include our study’s research questions, the relationship between our questions and the analyzed texts, our units of analysis and coding categories, our process of locating, sampling, coding, and analyzing textual and numerical data, and measures used to establish interrater reliability between the lead researcher and her contributor. Handouts of this study’s various research outputs, including papers, presentations, and posters, will be provided. This poster presentation will be valuable for researchers interested in conducting problem-driven content analyses, enhancing their data collection and management techniques, and analyzing quantitative and qualitative data.

Lieutenant, E. (2016, January). We’re expected to think, aren’t we? Evaluating LIS program-level student learning outcomes. Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) Annual Conference, Boston, MA.

This poster presents the framework for a quantitative content analysis of masters LIS program-level student learning outcomes across all ALA-accredited degree programs. Program-level student learning outcomes are a critical component of all educational programs. They form the essential frame of reference for designing curricula, delivering instruction, and assessing student learning. In 2013, O’Connor and Mulvaney observed that a broad-basis analysis of LIS program-level student learning outcomes has never been conducted. To address this gap, this study will investigate the following research questions: (1) Do LIS programs have program-level student learning outcomes that include: (1a) Measurable action verbs that clearly define the cognitive processes students are expected to use? (1b) A description of the competencies students are expected to learn and demonstrate upon graduation? (2) How are higher- and lower-order cognitive processes represented in program-level student learning outcomes? (3) How are professional competencies represented in program-level student learning outcomes? (4) How are the relationships between cognitive processes and professional competency areas expressed in program-level student learning outcomes? The category scheme will be inductively developed using two primary texts: Anderson and Krathwohl’s (2000) Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives and the American Library Association’s (2008) Core Competences of Librarianship.

Clough, E., & Lieutenant, E. (2016, January). How confident are LIS students in their cataloging skills? Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) Annual Conference, Boston, MA.

There are three stakeholders groups in cataloging education: educators, students, and professionals. Each of these groups has a unique and active voice in the curriculum design and outputs of cataloging and classification education. Hudson’s (2010) detailed review of the types of cataloging education research conducted over the last twenty years revealed a lack of scholarship on cataloging students’ perceptions of their educational experiences. Through this proposed study, the researchers hope to give students a voice in cataloging education. Through a series of surveys, distributed to students enrolled in a cataloging and classification course, students will provide feedback on whether they are learning tangible cataloging skills. In these surveys, students will rate their confidence in their ability to perform the course-related skills outside of a classroom and without the guidance of a professor or student peers. The surveys will be used at the beginning and end of the semester, and whenever there is a significant course topic change. If students need professional cataloging skills for the workplace, library schools must ensure students gain those skills within their coursework. This results of this proposed study could be used in multiple ways: the professor could adjust the course, program could justify curriculum-related decisions, and researchers could develop the survey instruments to gather additional indirect student learning outcomes assessment data.

Lieutenant, E. (2015, October). A critical research agenda for LIS program administration. Research Invitational for Master’s Students, New Brunswick, NJ.

Given the competing interests and values influencing higher education and the LIS field, it is imperative that individuals involved these spheres engage in critical, intentional, and reflective praxis to promote positive social and organizational change. Through various research projects, my scholarship focuses on critical approaches to LIS education. Specifically, my research agenda investigates how higher education structures, such as outcomes assessment, continuous improvement processes, and accreditation activities, can be used to promote reflective praxis, educational equity, student agency, and organizational change. This poster presents an overview and synthesis of four research projects that form the basis of my agenda. First, I will present the key findings of a study on LIS student engagement in systematic program planning. A content analysis of 15 Program Presentations was conducted to determine what methods programs use to engage students in program planning and assessment, how broadly and systematically these methods are used, and how students have had an impact on developing and improving their programs. The results of this study indicate that LIS programs use unique strategies, comprised of a variety of methods, to engage students. However, the impact students have had in the implementation of programmatic changes and improvements is relatively modest in scope. Next, I will present the framework and primary texts that will be used to conduct a quantitative content analysis of masters LIS program-level student learning outcomes across all ALA-accredited degree programs. This study will address a gap identified by O’Connor and Mulvaney (2013), who observed that a broad-basis analysis of LIS program-level student learning outcomes has never been conducted. Its primary objective is to determine what, if any, correlations exist between higher-order cognitive processes and professional competencies. The results of this study can be used by prospective students as an evaluation tool and by LIS program designers as a benchmarking tool. In addition, I will present the preliminary results of a program-level longitudinal study of LIS student diversity. This study seeks to identify factors that have contributed to the successful recruitment and retention of students and faculty from underrepresented backgrounds. Future developments in this study will draw upon ALISE Statistical Reports and consultation with LIS programs that have experienced the strongest increases in diverse student and faculty representation. The results of this study will be useful to LIS programs seeking to promote representation in the LIS field and inclusive organizational cultures. Finally, I will present the framework for a study on LIS student voice in Program Presentations. This study will use critical discourse analysis to investigate the positionality of and power dynamics between students and faculty through the selective use, framing, and codification of student voice in accreditation documentation. It will critically interrogate the ways a program situates the voices of their students in these documents. Further, it will explore how the representation of student voice serves as an indicator of the support or suppression of student agency.

Lieutenant, E., & Schneider, R. (2015, February). Targeted market analysis for neighborhood library services at Watha T. Daniel / Shaw neighborhood library. Bridging the Spectrum: A Symposium on Scholarship and Practice in Library and Information Science, Washington, DC.

This poster presentation details a market research project at the Watha T. Daniel / Shaw Neighborhood Library. The staff of the library was interested in identifying where the library’s sphere of influence begins and ends, and the unique demographic makeup of their community. A library service area map was created based on patron exit-survey data and the library’s proximity to other DC Public Library branches. Demographic data from 24 census tracts that fall within and border the library’s service area was collected, analyzed, and compared with demographic data from the District. Through this project, library staff gained new insight into the demographics of the community they serve and identified what makes their community unique. This project serves as an important first step in learning more about the library’s community, and provides a model for practitioners and researchers interested in market research and community needs assessment, data collection and analysis, and utilizing geographic information systems in library settings.

Katz, R. & Lieutenant, E. (2015, February). Making the implicit explicit: Prioritizing social justice and Catholic social teachings in the LIS core curriculum. Bridging the Spectrum: A Symposium on Scholarship and Practice in Library and Information Science, Washington, DC.

As library school students, we uphold the ALA Core Values of Librarianship; as students in a Catholic institution, we find inherent good in Catholic social teachings; and as members of our professional community, we value social justice. The presenters find overlap in the information professional’s roles as facilitators of democratic participation, providers of equitable access to resources and services, promoters of diversity, supporters of social responsibility, and preservers of the public good. In this poster, the presenters explore how LIS programs have capitalized on opportunities to further embed these concepts in LIS curricula and how students can enhance their own education in furtherance of our professional values and CUA’s institutional mission. The presenters invite students, faculty, alumni, and practitioners to share their own innovative ideas on this topic.

Lieutenant, E. (2015, January). Whose education is it anyway? Student engagement in LIS program assessment and evaluation. Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) Annual Conference, Chicago, IL.

This poster presentation will highlight methods of student involvement in program assessment and evaluation that have been widely adopted by recently accredited LIS programs. Data from 15 publicly available program presentations from programs fully accredited between Fall 2011 and Spring 2014 reveals a range of activities, including course evaluations, surveys, self-assessments, and exit interviews, amongst others. These results will be of particular interest to LIS faculty and administrators seeking to effectively engage students in program assessment and evaluation to ensure compliance with ALA’s Standards for Accreditation.

Lieutenant, E. (2014, May). Embedded librarianship in online learning environments: Where librarians meet library & information science programs online. Maryland Library Association and Delaware Library Association (MLA/DLA) Joint Library Conference, Ocean City, MD.

Embedded librarianship has proven to be an effective way of increasing the use of library resources and services. As the number of online course offerings has grown, academic librarians are contemplating how best to work with this non-traditional student population. Embedded librarianship holds the key to successfully engaging students in online learning environments. This poster identifies three studies on embedded librarianship practices in online LIS programs. In addition, it covers three elements essential to the success of any embedded librarianship program, identified by Tumbleson and Burke as “partnership, participation, and community.” These insights will be of interest to prospective and current students and alumni of online LIS programs, academic librarians considering adopting embedded librarianship programs in online learning environments, and LIS instructors concerned with the provision of library services to their students.

 

Invited Facilitation and Moderation Activities

Lieutenant, E. (2016, September). Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation webinar: General forum. Association Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation, Chicago, IL.

The Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation seeks broad input from the LIS community. To this end, the Task Force will be staging a series of online forums targeting certain populations and capped with a general forum for those who have not otherwise had an opportunity to contribute. Each forum will be hosted by a facilitator from the Task Force. Attendance at each forum will be capped at 100. The facilitator will have a set of guiding questions, but discussion is otherwise open. The conversation will be recorded.

Lieutenant, E. (2016, August). Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation webinar: Current LIS students and recent LIS graduates. American Library Association Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation, Chicago, IL.

The Task Force on the Context of Future Accreditation seeks broad input from the LIS community. To this end, the Task Force will be staging a series of online forums targeting certain populations and capped with a general forum for those who have not otherwise had an opportunity to contribute. Each forum will be hosted by a facilitator from the Task Force. Attendance at each forum will be capped at 100. The facilitator will have a set of guiding questions, but discussion is otherwise open. The conversation will be recorded.

Kaddell, M., Marshall, A., Minter, C., & Lieutenant, E. (2014, November). Blogging for work, blogging for life. Special Libraries Association DC Chapter Writing Series, Washington, DC.

Why blog? Blogging can help you build your presence in the professional community, grow your expertise on topics of professional and personal interest, expand your career options, develop professional connections, and satisfy your creative spirit. Our three panelists will share their blogging journey and what they’ve learned along the way. Whether you’ve never written a blog post before or you’re a seasoned blogger, this program will provide insight and inspiration from three very different perspectives.

 

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